Day: February 10, 2015

Parents Need To Get Involved

  • by Jodi-Ann Gilpin, Gleaner Writer
  • Source

Chief education officer at the Ministry of Education, Dr Grace McLean.

Chief education officer at the Ministry of Education, Dr Grace McLean.

Dr Grace McLean, chief education officer in the Ministry of Education, has underscored the need for parents to be involved in the lives of their children.

McLean, who was guest speaker at the launch of the second phase of the Re-birth project on Saturday, said that evidence continues to show that children who have wholesome parental support achieve better results in school.

“Sometimes you get the impression that parents forget that they have a responsibility, because they believe that it is the teachers who should embark on caring for their children, and while teachers should carry out their jobs with love, a mother and father are the only ones who can give the kind of love that a child needs,” she told the gathering at the Spanish Court Hotel.

“I am not trying to ignore the fact that parenting is difficult. As a mother, I know that it can be very challenging, but we have to be there for our children. It doesn’t matter what your circumstances are, children must be cared for,” she said.

She also encouraged children to develop attitudes of self-defiance and determination, adding that great things can come from the inner-city.

“I’m not scoffing at any occupation, but don’t think that because your mother sells at the market, you have to do the same thing. The challenges might be overwhelming, but nothing comes easy, and you can achieve great things. Your living conditions or address has nothing to do with your destiny,” McLean declared.

Noting that there have been successes in the first phase, co-founder of the Re-birth project, Melody Cammock- Gayle, pointed out that this second phase will carry with it more interactive activities.

“One of the lessons we learnt was that you cannot talk to them [participants] too long, you have to ensure that there are adequate activities to keep them occupied, and so this year, we will have a lot of field trips and interactive sessions,” she told The Gleaner.

“We have to create an avenue through which they expand their horizons and dream big, and we are expecting great things.

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Microsoft files trademark for ‘Windows 365,’ but rumors of a subscription remain murky

Microsoft wants to lock down the obvious name for a Windows subscription service, filing a trademark for “Windows 365.”

The trademark application now appears on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office website, where it was spotted by Neowin. While no Windows 365 service currently exists, the application at least shows that Microsoft wants the option to use the name in the future.

A potential Windows subscription service has been the subject of speculation for years, but the idea has resurfaced lately as Microsoft shakes up its licensing model for Windows 10. In the first year after release, Windows 7 and Windows 8 users can upgrade for free, and Microsoft has promised to keep those devices up to date throughout their lifetimes. Microsoft is also offering a version of Windows for low-end devices with no licensing fees attached.

It’s possible that Microsoft could launch a subscription service on top, with additional features for enterprise users. Microsoft is already moving in this direction with Office, allowing iOS, Android, and web users to access core editing features for free, while requiring an Office 365 subscription for advanced features and business use.

But as of last May, the well-connected Mary Jo Foley at ZDNet was reporting that Microsoft didn’t have a subscription version of Windows in the works. She also noted that Microsoft already offers an auto-renewing Windows licensing service for enterprises.

Why this matters: Perhaps things have changed since last year, though it’s just as likely that Microsoft is merely looking to cover its trademark bases. The company has beenburned a couple of times by trademark issues before, and the idea of Windows 365 is plausible enough that Microsoft would want to lock it down. It’s best not to read into this too much.